Greenfield: Every Country Except America Can Land on the Moon

On January 18th, the latest attempt in over 50 years by the United States to return to the moon burned up over the Pacific Ocean. A day later, Japan’s lunar lander made it to the moon.In 2023, India landed its robot lander on the moon in a mission that only cost $75 million, while in 2020, China became the third nation, after America and the USSR, to return lunar samples.

So why is the United States still struggling to manage something that every other country seems to be able to do and that American engineers used to be able to pull off with slide rules? The Apollo computer used memory made of wire ropes woven by women in the garment industry.Back then we picked the best and the brightest who had the “right stuff”. Now the right stuff consists of checking DEI boxes.“NASA is embracing inclusion”, the space agency announced, “and is pursuing a set of missions that will shatter the highest of glass ceilings: landing the first woman and person of color on the Moon. While the first Moon landing in 1969 was named after the Greek god Apollo, NASA’s return missions are referred to as Artemis – Apollo’s twin sister and goddess of the Moon.”The inclusive planned return mission to the moon will consist of a black man, a woman and a white guy for a perfectly balanced diverse expedition. Rather than picking the best people, it was announced that there would be a female astronaut because it would be inspirational, and then it was just a matter of deciding which woman fit that particular mandatory inspiration slot.

Victor Glover, the black mission pilot, who had been working on Senator John McCain’s staff when he was selected as a NASA astronaut candidate, is preparing for his mission by listening to Gil Scott-Heron’s racist rant ‘Whitey on the Moon’ “twice a week on the way to work.””This is their crew, this is our crew, this is humanity’s crew… each has their own story, but, together, they represent our creed: E pluribus unum – out of many, one,” NASA Administrator, and former Senate Democrat, Bill Nelson gushed.The point of E pluribus unum is the ‘unum’. Nelson, like most modern lefties, emphasizes the ‘pluribus’ over the ‘unum’ and so the many never actually become one, and nothing gets done.NASA may no longer be a leader in space, but, in its own words, it is a “proud leader in DEIA” and has a special program providing “gender transition” with a guide covering “agender”, or people who claim to have no gender, as well as the “gender expansive” who “expand notions of gender expression” and may “identify as a mix of genders, some identify more binarily as a man or a woman, and some identify as no gender.” Employees are urged to snitch on fellow co-workers if they “hear or observe a co-worker using an incorrect name or incorrect pronouns.”

But they may need another doctorate just to identify all the correct pronouns to use.Once, NASA hoped to encounter space aliens out there, now it’s creating them down here.NASA has a team that will update everything for the lunatic’s “current genders, names and pronouns” (which may or may not change on a biweekly basis) and then deploy a “workplace gender transition plan” that is only a little less complicated than the original moon landings.Over 50 years after the last man walked on the moon, NASA is still doing very difficult things. Unfortunately they’re not the things that JFK had in mind when he proclaimed that, “we choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard.” Landing on the moon and convincing Bob that everyone is going along with his pretense that he’s now Roberta after he put on a blond wig both require a lot of work.We could go to the moon or we can pander to Bob’s delusions. NASA has made its choice.

That’s why Japan, India and China’s space agencies, which have given precisely zero thought to what would happen if Kenji, Ashok or Guo decide they’re women, are landing on the moon.And we’re not.DEI and excellence are mutually opposed universal forces. NASA’s DEI plan, like most of its kind, claims that “greatest mission success” comes from “a diverse and inclusive workforce in a positive and safe work environment where individuals can be authentic”. NonsenseOur original space program workplace mixed together Jews and ex-Nazi war criminals, and sent a bunch of straight white men to the moon: three of whom (all with Jr at the ends of their names), armed with their wits, ingeniously survived a disaster and returned home. Others did not. None of this was “safe” or “inclusive” or particularly “diverse”, but it was genuinely great.Our mission successes in space predated an era of bureaucratic bloat, massive waste, failed projects and then pandering to every sexual fetish under the stars. (And some beyond them.)

NASA’s “progressive, visionary approach to DEIA” ends up stuck on earth with “five partners each of a different sex”, “six kinds of VD” and a seven percent increase in its budget to $27 billion only to end up losing to the lunar race to China, India and Japan.India spent $75 million to go to the moon. NASA’s DEIA budget clocks in at $14 million.What are we getting for our money?“When I first came out, I did not come out as nonbinary at work. I wasn’t sure that people would accept that, so I came out as transmasculine and am only recently being completely authentic about it, like, ‘Actually, I’m nonbinary, and my pronouns are they/them,’” Mars “research scientist” Silas J. Ralston explains in a special NASA feature.“All of the transgender people I know at NASA are white, and most of the transgender people I know at NASA are transmasculine and not transfeminine. That disparity is sort of reflective of the general world, is that the intersections of race and gender and sexuality, that the burdens of minoritization, fall the heaviest on black transfeminine people who often are not afforded the same grace and the same opportunities that white, light-skinned, or transmasculine people are.”Who needs to land on the moon anyway or explore the universe when we can have this?Once upon a time, NASA wanted to go to the stars, but now it wants to make sure that men can go where no man has gone before… the ladies’ room.

Daniel Greenfield

Daniel Greenfield is a blogger and columnist born in Israel and living in New York City. He is a Shillman Journalism Fellow at the David Horowitz Freedom Center and a contributing editor at Family Security Matters. Daniel's original biweekly column appears at Front Page Magazine and his blog articles regularly appear at Family Security Matters, the Jewish Press, Times of Israel, Act for America and Right Side News, as well as daily at the Canada Free Press and a number of other outlets. He has a column titled Western Front at Israel National News and his op eds have also appeared in the New York Sun, the Jewish Press and at FOX Nation. Daniel was named one of the Jewish Press' Most Worthwhile Blogs from 2006-2011 and his writing has been cited by Rush Limbaugh, Melanie Philips, Robert Spencer, Daniel Pipes, Judith Klinghoffer, John Podhoretz, Jeff Jacoby and Michelle Malkin, among others. Daniel's blog, http://sultanknish.blogspot.com, is a daily must-read.

Related Articles

Back to top button
Close
Close

Please disable ad blocker.

We work hard to write our articles and provide you with the content you enjoy. The ads on the site allow us to continue our work while feeding our families. If you'd please whitelist our site in your ad blocker or remove your ad blocker altogether, we'd greatly appreciate it. Thank you!